Scot Cheben

Senior Advisor
5 years in practice
About

Scot is an Army Veteran. He spent his early life working in aeronautics before owning his own home care business. His dedication to care for seniors spawned when faced with the need to find care services for his dad. In 2009, Scot’s father had bypass surgery. While flying back and forth from his home in California to his father's home in North Carolina to take care for him, Scot realized that he needed help. He began looking for a company in North Carolina that he could call to assist his ailing father with his daily activity needs. It was during this experience that people began to tell Scot that he “was made for such a job” as working in the home-health care industry. Scot began to consider buying a franchise and after interviewing the CEO’s of various franchises he settled on Senior Helpers as the best. “The rest”, as Scot says, “is history.” His home care agency has been recognized nationally for two consecutive years in providing the best customer service. In 2015, his company won a local readers choice award for best In-Home Care Business in the San Gabriel Valley, California. During his tenure he has assisted many of his clients and families cope with the day to day life of home care. When he is not working, he enjoys hiking and other outdoor activities.

Answers  (32)

It's not the question of who is better, but understanding the difference between the two and the risk associated with them.  Understanding this can save you money and protect you from potential legal problems.  Here are some components to consider.   Care-plans: When it comes to caring for a loved... (more)

It's not the question of who is better, but understanding the difference between the two and the risk associated with them.  Understanding this can save you money and protect you from potential legal problems.  Here are some components to consider.  

Care-plans:

When it comes to caring for a loved one by a registry, you may be responsible for knowing what services they need.  By going through an agency, they are responsible for making sure you get the right services from the right caregiver. They match caregivers to clients based on their personalities and skill-set needed.

Taxes & Injuries:

By using a registry, you are responsible for reporting and paying taxes, social security, and providing worker’s compensation (in case of a work related injury in the home) for the caregiver. They are essentially your employee.  Failure to do so can result in fines and penalties. Most agencies employee W-2 employees — not 1099. You should pay the agency directly (never the caregiver), and the agency manages all taxes and expenses related to employment that are required by the state and federal governments.

Hiring and Scheduling:

Hiring someone from a registry, you are responsible for the interviewing and hiring process. You will also be responsible for scheduling. If a caregiver calls out or doesn’t show up, you will need to find their replacement.  Agencies have experience with hiring compassionate and dependable caregivers. They are also responsible for scheduling and ensuring reliable and consistent care.

Supervision:

Going through a registry, you are in charge and responsible for managing the caregiver’s performance.  An agency will manage all of the employees and should perform unscheduled supervisory visits.

Theft:

You will be responsible for losses if the employee steals from you or your loved one when you go through a registry.  Agencies should be licensed (if required by state), insured, and all of their employees should be bonded.

Background Checks:

When using a registry you need to verify if they have done a background check.  Not all do.  You are responsible for this and neglecting to order and review a background check could place your loved one in danger.  Agencies provide background checks on all of their employees. They should be screened through criminal background checks and license checks, and are required to provide the proper identification.

Please consider these things when bringing someone in to care for a loved one.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

My first question to you is, "Do you or a loved one live nearby?"  If so, there are several ways to go about this.  You can take turns checking in on her.  You would have to make a schedule for everyone to follow.  I would have to suggest that someone layout all of her meds in a pill box for the... (more)

My first question to you is, "Do you or a loved one live nearby?"  If so, there are several ways to go about this.  You can take turns checking in on her.  You would have to make a schedule for everyone to follow.  I would have to suggest that someone layout all of her meds in a pill box for the week ahead.  Following a schedule, the person for that day might give her a call around the time that she needs to take them and remind her.  Stay on the phone until she takes them.  Keep it positive.  The conversation should be similar to...  "Hi grandma.  Hope you are doing fine.  You asked me to call you and remind you to take your meds at noon."  Again, stay on the phone until she takes them.  It is a bit of a "fib" but it works.  When you make it sound like she requested it, she will be less offended as if you were just checking up on her.  Every week when the meds are refilled you can see how many days were missed.  It would be good to note for her next visit with the doctor.  

If you don't live by, you might look into asking a neighbor or friend that visits often.  If that isn't an option either, You might want to discuss your situation with a local home care agency to assist.  You might have to have someone fill the pill boxes as this procedure might not be performed by all home care agencies.  Ask them if they can do this before contracting with them.  There might be alternatives that they could suggest.  

There are electronic medication dispensers that will remind her at specific times to take her meds.  Some even offer to phone her if does take them.  These are billed to a credit card every month.  Keep in mind that you are still responsible to get them filled by a qualified person.  

Please keep in mind that if you are giving her meds and she doesn't want to take them for whatever reason, you can always crush them and put them in applesauce.  DO NOT crush just any pill.  Check with your pharmacist to see if it can be crushed.  Some medications have time released layers.  Always check with your doctor as well before changing her care or meds and get their input first.  

This is not an easy job and can be time consuming for anyone.  If the medication is something that is very important that she takes on a regular schedule and could cause problems if she misses them, you may be faced with considering a facility for her.  These are things to discuss with her doctor about.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.