Scot Cheben

Senior Advisor
5 years in practice
About

Scot is an Army Veteran. He spent his early life working in aeronautics before owning his own home care business. His dedication to care for seniors spawned when faced with the need to find care services for his dad. In 2009, Scot’s father had bypass surgery. While flying back and forth from his home in California to his father's home in North Carolina to take care for him, Scot realized that he needed help. He began looking for a company in North Carolina that he could call to assist his ailing father with his daily activity needs. It was during this experience that people began to tell Scot that he “was made for such a job” as working in the home-health care industry. Scot began to consider buying a franchise and after interviewing the CEO’s of various franchises he settled on Senior Helpers as the best. “The rest”, as Scot says, “is history.” His home care agency has been recognized nationally for two consecutive years in providing the best customer service. In 2015, his company won a local readers choice award for best In-Home Care Business in the San Gabriel Valley, California. During his tenure he has assisted many of his clients and families cope with the day to day life of home care. When he is not working, he enjoys hiking and other outdoor activities.

Answers  (32)

I applaud you for being proactive!  You are touching on multiple topics with this question.  I reached out to a very special person, Chris Cooper to help answer this.  Chris is the owner and founder of Chris Cooper & Company, a financial planning firm working with people who own small businesses... (more)

I applaud you for being proactive!  You are touching on multiple topics with this question.  I reached out to a very special person, Chris Cooper to help answer this.  Chris is the owner and founder of Chris Cooper & Company, a financial planning firm working with people who own small businesses, with persons preparing to retire, and very elderly persons. Chris provides counseling and guidance in the areas of investments, taxation, and estate preservation.  As you can see he is perfect to answer this question.  

Chris suggested that you start with your own preparation for getting older, then it will be easier to talk to your parents about theirs.  First, take stock of where you are now; assets and liabilities, income from what sources, risk management tools such as insurance policies for life, health, Disability Income & Long Term Care,  home, car, and liability, Wills, Trusts, Powers of Attorney for financial and health care matters.  Then make an appointment to see a comprehensive fee only financial planner and an estate planning attorney.  

As you are going through the process, you will see what things you think may be lacking in your parent’s planning, and then you get show them you are “all grown up” and are taking responsibility for your own aging, and wanted to ask Mom and Dad, “What planning have you done?”

Thank you Chris for answering this!


Chris Cooper MSFS, CFP®, EA

California Licensed Professional Fiduciary #615

4080 Centre Street, Suite 202

San Diego, CA  92103

EMAIL: chris@chriscooper.com

VOICE: (800) 352-7674

ChrisCooper.com

Baby Boomers Guide to Aging

Elder Care Advocates

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

With your Dad's situation, it would be best to have a Home Care Company that is located near the final destination.  For example, if your dad is flying into LAX and then going to Pasadena to be with family... it would be best to hire a home care company in the Pasadena area.  Have the company (or... (more)

With your Dad's situation, it would be best to have a Home Care Company that is located near the final destination.  For example, if your dad is flying into LAX and then going to Pasadena to be with family... it would be best to hire a home care company in the Pasadena area.  Have the company (or Caregiver) coordinate with the airline to assure a clean hand-off.  The airline will let the company (caregiver) know exactly where and when to pick him up.  The airline is responsible from the airplane/gate to somewhere in a non-secure area like baggage claim to transfer the responsibility of getting him to the final destination.  You will be charged an hourly charge and possible mileage or both.  Only go with an agency that provides THEIR employees with the correct insurance (liability, workers compensation, etc.) to cover them and your dad.  Also make sure the company collects current MVR's on all their caregivers.  Having a caregiver assist dad from the airport to the car and ultimately to the final destination should bring piece of mind knowing he will get there.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

Without understanding your plans or financial situation completely, I’ll explain the rules and give guidance of where to turn to for specific answers on your situation.  Medicare Part A only covers skilled care given in a certified nursing facility for individuals who meet certain conditions... (more)

Without understanding your plans or financial situation completely, I’ll explain the rules and give guidance of where to turn to for specific answers on your situation.  Medicare Part A only covers skilled care given in a certified nursing facility for individuals who meet certain conditions.  Medicare doesn't cover all services. In most cases it doesn't cover long-term care stays in a nursing home.  The services that Medicare doesn't cover, you'll have to pay out of pocket for them, unless you have other insurance or a Medicare health plan that covers those services.  You may still have to pay your deductible, coinsurance, and co-payments.  To sum it up… you may still have out-of-pocket expenses each month.

Remember that Medicare is based on 3 main factors:

1) Federal and state laws.  

2) National coverage decisions made by Medicare about whether something is covered.

3) Local coverage decisions made by companies in each state that process claims for Medicare.

                    a. These companies decide whether something is medically necessary and should be covered in their area.

It’s almost impossible for one to know and understand each state’s rules and regulations as well as reimbursements that might be covered by each individual plan, so I recommend that you talk to your State Health Insurance Program (SHIP). Contact information is available at the “Contacts” link on the Medicare Website

www.medicare.gov/Contacts/


We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

According to the Colorado State Requirements it is understood that...  "A property tax exemption is available to qualifying senior citizens and the surviving spouses of those who previously qualified. There are three basic requirements to qualify: 1) The qualifying senior must be at least 65 years... (more)

According to the Colorado State Requirements it is understood that... 

"A property tax exemption is available to qualifying senior citizens and the surviving spouses of those who previously qualified. There are three basic requirements to qualify: 1) The qualifying senior must be at least 65 years old on January 1 of the year in which he or she applies; 2) The qualifying senior must be the property owner of record and must have been so for at least 10 consecutive years prior to January 1; and 3) The qualifying senior must occupy the property as his or her primary residence and must have done so for at least 10 consecutive years prior to January 1."

I would have to say no in this case.  I would discuss this with your family or your parents CPA further.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

In most states the Patient Bill of Rights suggests that you have the right to refuse treatment and be told what effect this may have on your health .  As long as you're cognitiv e .  I'll let a lawyer suggest an approach if they are not.  Did your husband speak to his dad about this matter?  Had dad... (more)

In most states the Patient Bill of Rights suggests that you have the right to refuse treatment and be told what effect this may have on your health.  As long as you're cognitive.  I'll let a lawyer suggest an approach if they are not.  Did your husband speak to his dad about this matter?  Had dad given a reason for not wanting to be cleaned up?  A lot of times people feel uncomfortable with someone else bathing them.  Another reason is that they are afraid of loosing their independence.  I'm not sure how the facility is approaching the subject or how much effort is being placed on the subject.  Have they tried both type of nurses (male or female)?  There are other alternatives that your husband can try to get dad bathed.  

I would recommend talking to his Primary Doctor that he knows well.  Sometimes talking to his doctor and alerting them of the situation, they can talk to him and inform him of the issues that can come from not keeping clean.  There usually is trust or a bond there.  Can dad clean himself up (sponge bath)?  You could find a local home care company that you could hire to come in try to bath him.  Check with the facility first to see if they allow outside hired help in.  They might have special requirements for insurance reasons.  

Another suggestion is talking to a Patient Representative — The patient representative is a member of the hospital staff who serves as a link between the patient, family, physicians and other hospital staff. The patient representative should be available to answer questions about hospital procedures, help with special needs or concerns and help solve problems. The patient representative is familiar with all hospital services and will assist you. There shouldn't be a charge for services rendered by the patient representative.  

I'm not sure how much longer dad has in rehab, but you could always look into another facility.  I don't recommend this only if there a serious health concern.  This might not be good for dad.  He might just refuse to bath there too.  

Only as a last resort, if nothing is working and there is a health concern, you may contact the New York State Department of Health by mail or phone.  You may call the toll-free number 1-888-201-4563 (Nursing Home Patient Care Complaints) or you may write them 

send it to:

New York State Department of Health

Centralized Hospital Intake Program

Mailstop: CA/DCS

Empire State Plaza

Albany, NY 12237

I hope everything works out.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

The answer is not so much a yes or no.  It might be a strong maybe.  There are several ways to get paid as a caregiver. Let me list a few and go into some of them for you... State run programs  Long term care insurance VA Benefits (Aid and Attendance) Drawing up a personal care agreement (Caregiver... (more)

The answer is not so much a yes or no.  It might be a strong maybe.  There are several ways to get paid as a caregiver. Let me list a few and go into some of them for you...

State run programs 

Long term care insurance

VA Benefits (Aid and Attendance)

Drawing up a personal care agreement (Caregiver contracts)

Life settlements

Reverse mortgage

Dependent tax exemptions

State Run Programs - In some states, they have programs that help financially crunched people pay for a caregiver.  In certain circumstances that could even be a family member.  Sometimes these programs have restrictions, waiting lists and remember that this is the government, so funding comes and goes.  To see availability and to see if you might qualify, visit your local Medicaid or aging services department.  In Las Vegas your aging services department can be found at   http://adsd.nv.gov/

LTC Insurance - If your parents a have a policy, contact the company and see how to initiate the policy.

VA Benefits - Please visit one of my articles that I previously wrote about this.   http://caregivinganswers.com/questions/how-do-i-qualify-my-dad-for-va-benefits-and-what-are-those-criterias

Drawing up a personal care agreement (Caregiver contracts) - If your parents have some savings or other assets set aside, they may be willing to work out a caregiver contract to help pay for things.  Please consult with a lawyer to make sure that the contract meets all the right conditions.  You don't want that to come back and haunt you.

Life Settlements - If your parents have a life insurance policy, a portion of it could be used to pay for care.   For more information on items like this visit    http://www.lifecarefunding.com/

Reverse Mortgage - Self explanatory?  If not, visit our icon to better understand.  http://caregivinganswers.com/topics/reverse-mortgage

Dependent tax exemptions - If all fails... and this isn't going to help with money coming in, but look to add your parents on as dependents.

As you can see there are options out there.  Whether or not you qualify for them... is another thing.  

Hope this helps!  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

I know that most people want to live in their home for as long as one can...  Here are some things to remember about cost, housing, legal and home care.  It sounds like you are leaving your home to your guardian that is taking care of you.  Questions to consider is: Do you have the proper... (more)

I know that most people want to live in their home for as long as one can...  Here are some things to remember about cost, housing, legal and home care.  It sounds like you are leaving your home to your guardian that is taking care of you.  Questions to consider is: Do you have the proper documentation to do this? Do you have a will or trust?  

I don't want to answer the question of selling your home directly because it depends on a few things that I don't know about you and your situation.  I want to provide you information so you can make an educated decision.  Facilities cost money.  The type of facility you choose will also depend on how much that will cost.  There are a limited number of beds (in facilities) that are available for people that have lower income. There are two types of facilities that could take you depending on your conditions and income.  

1) A skilled nursing facility.  Skilled nursing facility (SNF) also known as nursing homes or convalescent home, offers short term rehabilitative care. They provide around the clock long-term medical care to seniors with serious health problems. To qualify for services, the person needing services needs to have been an inpatient at the hospital for 3 nights (stays in the emergency room does not count). Secondly, you will need a physician order to qualify need of services.  How do you pay for a skilled nursing facility?  Services are paid through Medicare, Medicaid, your private health insurance, or out of pocket. Check with your individual insurance plans for coverage. Medicare pays for the first 20 days of stay, afterwards a co-pay is usually required up until the 100th day. When the 100 days are up, the individual is responsible for all costs. Please check with your facility about co-pay costs.

2) An assisted living facility. Senior housing option for those who need a wide range of non-medical in-home support services to help with activities of daily living, coordination of services by outside health providers, and monitoring resident activities to ensure their health and safety.  How do you pay for this type of facility? Payment is monthly and usually paid out of pocket or Long Term Care insurance; but some states have special need based programs that pay for a portion of the monthly fees. Payment is monthly and usually paid out of pocket or Long Term Care insurance; but some states have special need based programs that pay for a portion of the monthly fees. 

My answer to your question will be unsaid... As you can see there could be a need for money to be at either of these facilities.  But here is my thoughts moving forward.  You may not need to go to a facility.  Most of the services needed to remain in your home can be provided there.  

Home Healthcare provides medical services in the patient's residence.  To qualify for this service you must get your doctor’s order and be home bound, which essentially means it is extremely difficult for the senior to get around and out of the house. This service is usually covered by insurance such as Medicare, Medicaid or other private health insurances.

Hospice care is known as end-of-life care, as life expectancy is less than six months. A team of health care professionals and volunteers provides the service. They give medical, psychological, and spiritual support. The goal of the care is to help people who are dying have peace, comfort, and dignity. The caregivers try to control pain and other symptoms so a person can remain as alert and comfortable as possible. Hospice programs also provide services to support a patient's family.  Hospice service is traditionally covered under Medicare Part A.

Should you need money, you can always secure a reverse mortgage on your home.  If you’re 62 or older – and looking for money to pay for healthcare expenses – you may consider a reverse mortgage. It’s a product that allows you to convert part of the equity in your home into cash without having to sell your home or pay additional monthly bills.


We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

This is a very tough decision to quit work and take care of your mom.  Without understanding all of the financial background of everyone involved, let me explain that most of all federal and state government funded benefits are are either income based or participation based or both.  What I mean by... (more)

This is a very tough decision to quit work and take care of your mom.  Without understanding all of the financial background of everyone involved, let me explain that most of all federal and state government funded benefits are are either income based or participation based or both.  What I mean by this is that Medicaid (State funded) is driven based on your income where as VA Benefits (Federal funded) is driven by the time/date of military service and income.  If mom is a veteran she could qualify for VA Benefits (Aid and Attendance).  Even if mom is not a veteran, perhaps dad was and mom could qualify under his benefit.  I'll leave you with a couple of resources that you can follow up with and ask them the specifics (including your income situation).  

The Atlanta VA Regional Benefit Office is having a town hall where they will share information, listen to your feedback, and answer questions on VA disability compensation benefits, pension benefits, life insurance benefits, home loan benefits, education benefits, vocational rehabilitation and employment benefits, and health programs.  Here is the time/date:

January 23, 2016 | 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Location: Atlanta VA Medical Center, Ground Floor, Pete Wheeler Auditorium, 1670 Clairmont Road, Decatur, GA 30033.

Expected Participants: Veterans, their families, and survivors.


Also:

You can reach the Georgia DHS Division of Aging Services and Georgia's 12 Area Agencies on Aging operate the Aging and Disability Resource Connection. Call them at 1-866-552-4464.

Your Area Agency on Aging connection is:

Atlanta Regional Commission

Kathryn Lawler, AAA Director

40 Courtland Street, NE

Atlanta, GA 30303

Phone: 404.463.3333

Email: aginginfo@atlantaregional.com

http://aging.dhs.georgia.gov/caregiving

If there is something more that you would like to discuss, feel free to reach out directly to me or ask another question.  


We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

Good Question!  A lot of folks have the same question.  I reached out to a good friend of mine, Seth Walsh, to help better explain this.   They both cover you in case of an incapacity, but in very different ways. Long-Term Disability Income Insurance is designed to replace a large portion of your... (more)

Good Question!  A lot of folks have the same question.  I reached out to a good friend of mine, Seth Walsh, to help better explain this.  

They both cover you in case of an incapacity, but in very different ways. Long-Term Disability Income Insurance is designed to replace a large portion of your income if you become disabled and can't work on a full or part-time basis. It is triggered by a disabling injury or disease like an automobile accident or heart attack. The money you receive will help pay your bills, put food on your table and make sure your kids have clothes to go to school in.
 
Long-Term Care Insurance will pay to have someone care for you if you can no longer perform the Activities of Daily Living "ADL's". In general it doesn't matter how you have gotten to that point (expect in cases of self-inflicted injury and a few other instances). It is triggered by your inability to perform the ADL's. It provides money to pay for someone to care for you at home or for you to go to a care-giving facility like an Assisted Living Facility or a Nursing home.
 
So in reality someone of working age could receive benefits from both policies! They give you the ABILITY to maintain your lifestyle. One to take care of paying the bills and the other to pay the high cost of having someone care for you.

Seth C. Walsh provides Long Term Care, Medicare Supplements, Health, Life and Disability Income and Lifetime Guaranteed Income Solutions.  He is Multi-State Licensed and Partnership Certified, NAIFA, AALTCI.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

The steps you can take right now are to get as much education about this dreaded disease and also mentally prepare yourself.  I can help with the first part, but preparing yourself mentally is always a tough one.  I'll give you some advice on this as well.  I would start with the Alzheimer's... (more)

The steps you can take right now are to get as much education about this dreaded disease and also mentally prepare yourself.  I can help with the first part, but preparing yourself mentally is always a tough one.  I'll give you some advice on this as well.  I would start with the Alzheimer's Association and The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) websites.  They will keep you up-to-date on just about everything that is happening with this disease.  AFA provides you with finding local support groups (Link below).  This is where the mental preparation comes in. Talking to people, friends and family members that have gone through this as well as people like you that are going through this now will help you.  

http://www.alz.org/apps/we_can_help/support_groups.asp

Senior Helpers has a free DVD of their GEMS Program that you can request from their website. This DVD is designed for family members to better understand the disease and what they should expect as your grandfather progresses through the different stages.  (Link below)

 http://www.seniorhelpers.com/our-services/senior-gems

Now is the time to start a memory book(s) for your grandfather.  This will come in handy down the line when his memory gets worse.  It's always a calming effect to sit with him and look at book and discuss the past.  Include pictures from other family members that were taken with him.  Music is most important.  Start collecting the music he likes.  He will always have music to remember.  Another thing I like to suggest in the early stage is to interview him.  This isn't for everyone because it takes a lot of time.  If it is... ask him questions about his past and record it (audio or video).  This will give you an opportunity to research these things in more detail and then you can add them to the memory book.  People that did this told me that this was remarkable.  They learned things they never knew.   After all this... come back and let me know how it's going.   I'll suggest some other things.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

Before I recommend the best way to find the right facility, I would first suggest that you talk to your aunt about how she feels about moving into a facility.  "Slowing down" doesn't necessarily mean that one is ready or will ever be ready for a facility.  If she is not ready and the concern is... (more)

Before I recommend the best way to find the right facility, I would first suggest that you talk to your aunt about how she feels about moving into a facility.  "Slowing down" doesn't necessarily mean that one is ready or will ever be ready for a facility.  If she is not ready and the concern is coming from you, not her, then suggest to her to have an evaluation/assessment from a local home care company like Senior Helpers.  The assessments are usually free of charge and obligation.  Always ask first before you schedule one.  Other companies have charged $100 to do this.  There are options that a home care company can provide her that will give you peace of mind since you are out of state.  If your aunt doesn't want to live at home and is ready for a facility, there are a couple ways of doing this but since you are out of state, I would recommend the following... 

There are placement companies like CarePatrol.com that work on a national level finding facilities for people.  They are free.  They get paid from the facility when your aunt commits to that facility.  There are other companies like this out there, but I like them.  They will do an assessment of your aunt's needs and budget and they will take her on tour of the facilities that match her budget and needs.  When she narrows it down to one or two, you can visit these facilities with her and help her decide.  If you are interested in checklist for when you visit a facility, let me know and I can send you one.  These are good to have so you know the right questions to ask.  CarePatrol has their own checklist that they provide if you decide to work with them.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

So according to the 2015 "cost of care" published by Genworth, the Alabama state median is $3,075/month for a  (private)  one bedroom assisted living facility.  In Mobile AL, the same setting is $3553/month.  Highest in Alabama was in Anniston at $4150 and the lowest was Gadsden coming in at $250... (more)

So according to the 2015 "cost of care" published by Genworth, the Alabama state median is $3,075/month for a (private) one bedroom assisted living facility.  In Mobile AL, the same setting is $3553/month.  Highest in Alabama was in Anniston at $4150 and the lowest was Gadsden coming in at $2503.  These are average costs for the area where some might be higher or lower.  Please contact the facilities in the area and discuss their policies with them about "around the clock care".  Some are managed/billed differently than others.  Other options might be to hire a home care company to offset the skills and or the hours that the facility doesn't cover.  This would be an added expense. I hope this helps.   

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

There is a short answer to the question...  Yes.  Let me explain in more detail.  A caregiver is there for support.  Whether it be to care for the client or to provide respite care for the primary caregiver, that is the purpose for outsourcing this type of care.   Before you contract with a home... (more)

There is a short answer to the question...  Yes.  Let me explain in more detail.  A caregiver is there for support.  Whether it be to care for the client or to provide respite care for the primary caregiver, that is the purpose for outsourcing this type of care.  

Before you contract with a home care company, you should review all of the services that they provide.  Keep in mind that you want this company to grow with you as the care changes.  As hard as it may be, you need to think of what the future holds for you and the patient.  If they were to start to decline, you need to ask yourself, "Can I do this?"  Be honest with yourself.  I know that we all tend to think we can do thIngs without help or at least want to... But reality is... This is not easy.  If the company has limited service and they can't promise you that they can handle the changes, then you need to look elsewhere.  

Once you decide to go with a company, they will sit down with you, family members, and the patient to formalize a care plan.  This is a living document.  Meaning, it will be updated as things change either for the good or the bad.  It can be updated permanently or for a short period of time.  

During the construction of the care plan you all decide on the care that is needed.  Let me remind you to include the care for the primary caregiver as previously mentioned.  This could be the dusting, vacuuming and other things.  The company should advise you as the length of time it is needed to perform these tasks.  As the primary caregiver, you need to decide how often it needs to happen (example: 3 days/week). You both then need to prioritize the services.  What I mean by this is... Bathing and feeding the client is more important than dusting the living room. Sometimes the services may go as planned and other times they may not.  So if the caregiver gets done with all the tasks and there is still time left, then they would know to pick up the vacuum and put it to work.  Keep in mind that this is a work In progress at first.  Times and hours might need to be adjusted as well as the services.  On the other hand, if the caregiver gets done early and all the tasks are done, you should be able to send the caregiver home early. Please verify that there isn't additional cost for doing this.  Some companies require a minimum number of hours per day and will still charge you. Or they might have higher rates for less hours that are worked.  

There is another side that you will have to see and that is from the home care company's side.  Things may have settled down into a nice routine and all is going well with the caregiver and patient... Then you need to increase the hours.  That caregiver might not be able to cover the additional hours for whatever reason.  It could be that they have another client right after your services.  It is the home care company's obligation to fulfill the requirement of the additional hours, but it might have to be with a different caregiver.  This could cause stress for the patient and you.  You have to realize that caregivers are people too and have to make a living.  They can't do that by working 4 hours one or two days a week at minimum wage or slightly more.  Therefore the company provides different clients to their schedule.  

You have to communicate with the home care company. They work for you.  If you're not satisfied with the care or the services and you have given them plenty of chances to fix them... Go out and find a different company that is willing to help out.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

I'm so sorry to hear this.  Hospice is usually reserved for the final six months.   Timing is tough to predict these matters.   Since your mom is still under the care of her doctor, they would know when to transition her.   With mom being in the home setting already this transition should be... (more)

I'm so sorry to hear this.  Hospice is usually reserved for the final six months.  Timing is tough to predict these matters.  Since your mom is still under the care of her doctor, they would know when to transition her.  With mom being in the home setting already this transition should be seamless.  This final phase is designed to provide the patient with the comfort, quality of care and dignity one can only ask for in these final times. Hospice care isn’t about healing.  It allows patients to move through the dying process.  Through these tough times, hospice care also offers family members resources for the transition to grief ahead, usually in the form of chaplain visits. 

Most people who are facing their final days want to be surrounded with loved ones.  They prefer to be in a home setting versus a hospital.  The home environment is best for not only the patient, but for the family and friends that visit.  Once under the care of hospice, all the services and doctors will be coming from them.  You may want to consider home care (non-medical) to offset time off needed for loved ones that are involved on a daily basis.  You have to care for yourself as well during these times.  Other things to consider are the legal documents like wills, power of attorney and advance directives are all up-to-date.  

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.

Think about it as medical vs. non-medical needs.   Home health care (medical) is skilled medical services to help adults who are recovering from a hospital or facility stay and need additional medical support in their home. The services cover a variety of health care services that are given in the... (more)

Think about it as medical vs. non-medical needs.  

Home health care (medical) is skilled medical services to help adults who are recovering from a hospital or facility stay and need additional medical support in their home. The services cover a variety of health care services that are given in the home for seniors with an illness or injury. Depending on the type of need, these services are provided by nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, home health aides, and medical social workers. This service does not include 24-hour-a-day care at home, meals delivered to your home or personal care services.  How do I pay for Home Health Care (medical) services? To qualify for this service you must get your doctor’s order and be home bound, which essentially means it is extremely difficult for the senior to get around and out of the house. This service is usually covered by insurance such as Medicare, Medicaid and other private health insurances. It is best to review the type of insurance you have with a Home Health Care agency to determine if that insurance is accepted.

Home care (non-medical), also known as in-home care, private duty or custodial care; is supportive care provided in the home. Caregivers are trained to provide non-medical care to assist seniors with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) such as bathing, dressing, getting in and out of bed, and assistance with toileting. Other services that they can provide include: cooking, cleaning, laundry, transportation and other general assistance. Home care services allow people to remain at home rather than use residential, long-term or institutional nursing care.   How do I pay for Home Care (non-medical) services? Home Care (non-medical) services are charged on an hourly and flat rate basis and the cost ranges from $10 - $25 / hour depending on your location and level of service. Services are paid out of pocket or by long term care insurance. It is best to review your long term care policy to determine whether Home Care (non-medical) services are covered by your insurance.

 In order for seniors to remain living independently at home, they may need both home care and home health care or only one or the other.  Home health care is typically a short term, temporary service.  Skilled nurses or Physical therapist may come once or twice a week with a visit lasting about an hour or so.  Home care visits can be anywhere from one hour a day, once a week, to 24/7 around the clock care.  

When home care visits and home health care visits are performed in conjunction with each other, the likelihood of a hospital readmission is decreased.

We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and... (more)We at Care Giving Answers strive to provide helpful and relevant information to senior citizens and their families and loved ones. The material provided through our site is made available for informational purposes only. In no way should users of our site rely or act upon any information provided herein without seeking appropriate professional advice (medical, legal or financial). Users should independently verify the accuracy, completeness and relevance for their specific purposes. The information provided through our site is not intended to constitute professional advice and in no way forms or constitutes a professional-client relationship of any kind.